Size and Complexity Rules ("rulesets/size.xml")

AbcComplexity Rule

NOTE: This rule has been DEPRECATED, and disabled by default (i.e., by setting its enabled
property to false). Use the AbcMetric rule instead.

Calculates the ABC metric for methods/classes and checks against configured threshold values.

The maxMethodComplexity property holds the threshold value for the ABC complexity value (score) for each method. If this value is non-zero, a method with a complexity value greater than this value is considered a violation.

The maxClassAverageMethodComplexity property holds the threshold value for the average ABC complexity value (score) for each class. If this value is non-zero, a class with an average complexity value greater than this value is considered a violation.

This rule treats "closure fields" as methods. If a class field is initialized to a Closure (ClosureExpression), then that Closure is analyzed and checked just like a method.

Property Description Default Value
maxMethodComplexity The maximum ABC complexity value (score) allowed for a single
method (or "closure field"). If zero or null, then do not
check method-level complexity.
60
maxClassAverageMethodComplexity The maximum ABC complexity average value (score) allowed for
a class, calculated as the average complexity of its methods or
"closure fields". If zero or null, then do not check
class-level average complexity.
60
maxClassComplexity The maximum ABC complexity value (score) allowed for a class,
calculated as the total complexity of its methods or
"closure fields". If zero or null, then do not check
class-level complexity.
0
ignoreMethodNames Specifies one or more (comma-separated) method names that
that should not cause a rule violation. The names may
optionally contain wildcards (*,?). Note that the ignored
methods still contribute to the class complexity value.
null

ABC Size/Complexity Metric Calculation Rules

The ABC complexity value (score) is calculated as follows: The ABC metric measures size/complexity by counting the number of Assignments (A), Branches (B) and Conditions (C) and assigns a single numerical score calculated as:

|ABC| = sqrt((A*A)+(B*B)+(C*C))

The ABC Metric calculation rules for Groovy:

  • Add one to the assignment count for each occurrence of an assignment operator, excluding constant declarations: = *= /= %= += = = &= |= ^= >>>=
  • Add one to the assignment count for each occurrence of an increment or decrement operator (prefix or postfix): ++ --
  • Add one to the branch count for each function call or class method call.
  • Add one to the branch count for each occurrence of the new operator.
  • Add one to the condition count for each use of a conditional operator: == != = = = =~ ==~
  • Add one to the condition count for each use of the following keywords: else case default try catch ?
  • Add one to the condition count for each unary conditional expression.

Notes

  • See the ABC Metric specification
  • See the Blog post describing guidelines for interpreting an ABC score
  • This (Spanish) blog post about the eXcentia Sonar ABC Metric Plugin (for Java) includes a table of risk classifications for ABC scores for both methods and classes.
  • See the GMetrics ABC metric. This includes a discussion of guidelines for interpreting ABC scores.
  • This rule requires Groovy 1.6 (or later).
  • This rule requires the GMetrics jar on the classpath. See GMetrics.

AbcMetric Rule

Calculates the ABC size metric for methods/classes and checks against configured threshold values.

The maxMethodAbcScore property holds the threshold value for the ABC score for each method. If this value is non-zero, a method with an ABC score greater than this value is considered a violation. The value does not have to be an integer (e.g., 1.7 is allowed).

The maxClassAverageMethodAbcScore property holds the threshold value for the average ABC score for each class. If this value is non-zero, a class with an average ABC score value greater than this value is considered a violation. The value does not have to be an integer.

The maxClassAbcScore property holds the threshold value for the total ABC score value for each class. If this value is non-zero, a class with a total ABC score greater than this value is considered a violation. The value does not have to be an integer.

This rule treats "closure fields" as methods. If a class field is initialized to a Closure (ClosureExpression), then that Closure is analyzed and checked just like a method.

Property Description Default Value
maxMethodAbcScore The maximum ABC score allowed for a single
method (or "closure field"). If zero or null, then do not
check method-level scores.
60
maxClassAverageMethodAbcScore The maximum average ABC score allowed for
a class, calculated as the average score of its methods or
"closure fields". If zero or null, then do not check
class-level average scores.
60
maxClassAbcScore The maximum ABC score allowed for a class,
calculated as the total ABC score of its methods or
"closure fields". If zero or null, then do not check
class-level scores.
0
ignoreMethodNames Specifies one or more (comma-separated) method names that
that should not cause a rule violation. The names may
optionally contain wildcards (*,?). Note that the ignored
methods still contribute to the class complexity value.
null

ABC Size Metric Calculation Rules

The ABC score is calculated as follows: The ABC metric measures size by counting the number of Assignments (A), Branches (B) and Conditions (C) and assigns a single numerical score calculated as:

|ABC| = sqrt((A*A)+(B*B)+(C*C))

The ABC Metric calculation rules for Groovy:

  • Add one to the assignment count for each occurrence of an assignment operator, excluding constant declarations: = *= /= %= += = = &= |= ^= >>>=
  • Add one to the assignment count for each occurrence of an increment or decrement operator (prefix or postfix): ++ --
  • Add one to the branch count for each function call or class method call.
  • Add one to the branch count for each occurrence of the new operator.
  • Add one to the condition count for each use of a conditional operator: == != = = = =~ ==~
  • Add one to the condition count for each use of the following keywords: else case default try catch ?
  • Add one to the condition count for each unary conditional expression.

Notes

  • See the ABC Metric specification
  • See the Blog post describing guidelines for interpreting an ABC score
  • This (Spanish) blog post about the eXcentia Sonar ABC Metric Plugin (for Java) includes a table of risk classifications for ABC scores for both methods and classes.
  • See the GMetrics ABC metric. This includes a discussion of guidelines for interpreting ABC scores.
  • This rule requires Groovy 1.6 (or later).
  • This rule requires the GMetrics jar on the classpath. See GMetrics.

ClassSize Rule

Checks if the size of a class exceeds the number of lines specified by the maxLines property.

Property Description Default Value
maxLines The maximum number of lines allowed in a class definition. 1000

CrapMetric Rule

Calculates the C.R.A.P. (Change Risk Anti-Patterns) metric score for methods/classes and checks against configured threshold values.

The CRAP metric score is based on the cyclomatic complexity and test coverage for individual methods. A method with a CRAP value greater than the maxMethodCrapScore property causes a violation. Likewise, a class that has an (average method) CRAP value greater than the maxClassAverageMethodCrapScore property causes a violation.

NOTE: This rule requires the GMetrics[3] jar, version 0.5 (or later), on the classpath, as well as a Cobertura[4]-[6] XML coverage file. If either of these prerequisites is not available, this rule logs a warning messages and exits (i.e., does nothing).

The maxMethodCrapScore property holds the threshold value for the CRAP value for each method. If this value is non-zero, a method with a cyclomatic complexity value greater than this value is considered a violation.

The maxClassAverageMethodCrapScore property holds the threshold value for the average CRAP value for each class. If this value is non-zero, a class with an average cyclomatic complexity value greater than this value is considered a violation.

NOTE: This rule does NOT treat closure fields as methods (unlike some of the other size/complexity rules).

Property Description Default Value
coberturaXmlFile The path to the Cobertura XML coverage file for the Groovy code
By default, the path is relative to the classpath. But the path
may be optionally prefixed by any of the valid java.net.URL
prefixes, such as "file:" (to load from a relative or absolute
path on the filesystem), or "http:". This property is REQUIRED.
null
maxMethodCrapScore The maximum CRAP metric value allowed for a single method.
If zero or null, then do not check method-level complexity.
30
maxClassAverageMethodCrapScore The maximum CRAP average metric value allowed for a class,
calculated as the average CRAP value of its methods. If zero or
null, then do not check the average class-level CRAP value.
30
maxClassCrapScore The maximum total CRAP metric value allowed for a class,
calculated as the total CRAP value of its methods. If
zero or null, then do not check class-level CRAP value.
0
ignoreMethodNames Specifies one or more (comma-separated) method names that
that should not cause a rule violation. The names may
optionally contain wildcards (*,?). Note that the ignored
methods still contribute to the class complexity value.
null

CRAP Formula

Given a Groovy method m, C.R.A.P. for m is calculated as follows:

  C.R.A.P.(m) = comp(m)^2 * (1 - cov(m)/100)^3 + comp(m)

Where comp(m) is the cyclomatic complexity of method m, and cov(m) is the test code coverage provided by automated tests.

References

  • [1] The original 2007 blog post that defined the CRAP metric.
  • [2] A 2011 blog post from Alberto Savoia (the co-creator of the CRAP metric with Bob Evans), describing the formula, the motivation, and the CRAP4J tool for calculating CRAP score for Java code.
  • [3] The GMetrics CRAP Metric.
  • [4] Cobertura -- Cobertura is a free Java tool that calculates the percentage of code accessed by tests. It can be used to identify which parts of your Java program are lacking test coverage.
  • [5] Cobertura Ant Task Reference
  • [6] Cobertura Maven Plugin

CyclomaticComplexity Rule

Calculates the Cyclomatic Complexity for methods/classes and checks against configured threshold values.

The maxMethodComplexity property holds the threshold value for the cyclomatic complexity value for each method. If this value is non-zero, a method with a cyclomatic complexity value greater than this value is considered a violation.

The maxClassAverageMethodComplexity property holds the threshold value for the average cyclomatic complexity value for each class. If this value is non-zero, a class with an average cyclomatic complexity value greater than this value is considered a violation.

This rule treats "closure fields" as methods. If a class field is initialized to a Closure (ClosureExpression), then that Closure is analyzed and checked just like a method.

Property Description Default Value
maxMethodComplexity The maximum cyclomatic complexity value allowed for a single
method (or "closure field"). If zero or null, then do not
check method-level complexity.
20
maxClassAverageMethodComplexity The maximum average cyclomatic complexity value allowed for a
class, calculated as the average complexity of its methods or
"closure fields". If zero or null, then do not check
average class-level complexity.
20
maxClassComplexity The maximum total cyclomatic complexity value allowed for a
class, calculated as the total complexity of its methods or
"closure fields". If zero or null, then do not check
total class-level complexity.
0
ignoreMethodNames Specifies one or more (comma-separated) method names that
that should not cause a rule violation. The names may
optionally contain wildcards (*,?). Note that the ignored
methods still contribute to the class complexity value.
null

Cyclomatic Complexity Metric Calculation Rules

The cyclomatic complexity value is calculated as follows:

Start with a initial (default) value of one (1). Add one (1) for each occurrence of each of the following:

  • if statement
  • while statement
  • for statement
  • case statement
  • catch statement
  • && and || boolean operations
  • ?: ternary operator and ?: Elvis operator.
  • ?. null-check operator

Notes

MethodCount Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.11

Checks if the number of methods within a class exceeds the number of lines specified by the maxMethod property.

A class with too many methods is probably a good suspect for refactoring, in order to reduce its complexity and find a way to have more fine grained objects.

Property Description Default Value
maxMethods The maximum number of methods allowed in a class definition. 30

MethodSize Rule

Checks if the size of a method exceeds the number of lines specified by the maxLines property.

Property Description Default Value
maxLines The maximum number of lines allowed in a method definition. 100
ignoreMethodNames Specifies one or more (comma-separated) method names that
should be ignored (i.e., that should not cause a rule
violation). The names may optionally contain wildcards (*,?).
null

NestedBlockDepthRule Rule

Checks for blocks or closures nested more deeply than a configured maximum number. Blocks include if, for, while, switch, try, catch, finally and synchronized blocks/statements, as well as closures.

Methods calls, constructor calls, and property access through Builder objects are ignore. For instance, this code does not cause a violation:

    myBuilder.root {
        foo {
            bar {
                baz {
                    quix {
                        qux {
                            quaxz {
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
Property Description Default Value
maxNestedBlockDepth The maximum number of nesting levels. A block or closure nested
deeper than that number of levels is considered a violation.
5
ignoreRegex Determines what is a builder call. For instance, closures
nested on a method named createBuilder, a property named
myBuilder, or a constructor call to object MyBuilder() do
not produce violations.
.*(b