JUnit Rules ("rulesets/junit.xml")

ChainedTest Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.13

A test method that invokes another test method is a chained test; the methods are dependent on one another. Tests should be isolated, and not be dependent on one another.

Example of violations:

    class MyTest extends GroovyTestCase {
        public void testFoo() {

            // violations, calls test method on self
            5.times { testBar() }
            5.times { this.testBar() }

            // OK, no violation: one arg method is not actually a test method
            5.times { testBar(it) }
        }

        private static void assertSomething() {
            testBar() // violation, even if in helper method
            this.testBar() // violation, even if in helper method
        }

        public void testBar() {
            // ...
        }
    }

CoupledTestCase Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.13

This rule finds test cases that are coupled to other test cases, either by invoking static methods on another test case or by creating instances of another test case. If you require shared logic in test cases then extract that logic to a new class where it can properly be reused. Static references to methods on the current test class are ignored.

Example of violations:

    class MyTest extends GroovyTestCase {
        public void testMethod() {
            // violation, static method call to other test
            MyOtherTest.helperMethod()

            // violation, instantiation of another test class
            new MyOtherTest()

            // no violation; same class
            def input = MyTest.getResourceAsStream('sample.txt')
        }
    }

JUnitAssertAlwaysFails Rule

Rule that checks for JUnit assert() method calls with constant or literal arguments such that the assertion always fails. This includes:

  • assertTrue(false)
  • assertTrue(0)
  • assertTrue('')
  • assertTrue([])
  • assertTrue([:])
  • assertFalse(true)
  • assertFalse('abc')
  • assertFalse(99)
  • assertFalse([123])
  • assertFalse([a:123)
  • assertNull(CONSTANT).
  • assertNull([]).
  • assertNull([123]).
  • assertNull([:]).
  • assertNull([a:123]).

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

JUnitAssertAlwaysSucceeds Rule

Rule that checks for JUnit assert() method calls with constant arguments such that the assertion always succeeds. This includes:

  • assertTrue(true)
  • assertTrue(99)
  • assertTrue('abc')
  • assertTrue([123])
  • assertTrue([a:123])
  • assertFalse(false)
  • assertFalse('')
  • assertFalse(0)
  • assertFalse([])
  • assertFalse([:)
  • assertNull(null)

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

JUnitFailWithoutMessage Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.11

This rule detects JUnit calling the fail() method without an argument. For better error reporting you should always provide a message.

JUnitLostTest Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.18

This rule checks for classes that import JUnit 4 classes and contain a public, instance, void, no-arg method named test* that is not annotated with the JUnit 4 @Test annotation.

Note: This rule should be disabled for Grails 2.x projects, since the Grails test framework can use AST Transformations to automatically annotate test methods.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

Example of violations:

    import org.junit.Test

    class MyTestCase {
        void testMe() { }           // missing @Test annotation
    }

JUnitPublicField Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.19

Checks for public fields on a JUnit test class. There is usually no reason to have a public field (even a constant) on a test class.

Fields within interfaces and fields annotated with @Rule are ignored.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

Example of violations:

    import org.junit.Test
    class MyTestCase {
        public int count                        // violation
        public static final MAX_VALUE = 1000    // violation

        @Test
        void testMe() { }
    }

JUnitPublicNonTestMethod Rule

Rule that checks if a JUnit test class contains public methods other than standard test methods, JUnit framework methods or methods with JUnit annotations.

The following public methods are ignored by this rule:

  • Zero-argument methods with names starting with "test"
  • The setUp() and tearDown() methods
  • Methods annotated with @Test
  • Methods annotated with @Before and @After
  • Methods annotated with @BeforeClass and @AfterClass
  • Methods annotated with @Override

Public, non-test methods on a test class violate conventional usage of test classes, and they typically break encapsulation unnecessarily.

Public, non-test methods may also hide unintentional 'Lost Tests'. For instance, the test method declaration may (unintentionally) include methods parameters, and thus be ignored by JUnit. Or the method may (unintentionally) not follow the "test.." naming convention and not have the @Test annotation, and thus be ignored by JUnit.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

JUnitPublicProperty Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.21

Checks for public properties defined on JUnit test classes. There is typically no need to expose a public property (with public getter and setter methods) on a test class.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

Property Description Default Value
ignorePropertyNames Specifies one or more (comma-separated) property names that
should be ignored (i.e., that should not cause a rule
violation). The names may optionally contain wildcards (*,?).
null

Example of violations:

    import org.junit.Test
    class MyTestCase {
        static String id    // violation
        def helper          // violation
        String name         // violation

        @Test
        void testMe() { }
    }

JUnitSetUpCallsSuper Rule

Rule that checks that if the JUnit setUp method is defined, that it includes a call to super.setUp().

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

JUnitStyleAssertions Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.11

This rule detects calling JUnit style assertions like assertEquals, assertTrue, assertFalse, assertNull, assertNotNull. Groovy 1.7 ships with a feature called the "power assert", which is an assert statement with better error reporting. This is preferable to the JUnit assertions.

JUnitTearDownCallsSuper Rule

Rule that checks that if the JUnit tearDown method is defined, that it includes a call to super.tearDown().

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

JUnitTestMethodWithoutAssert Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.12

This rule searches for test methods that do not contain assert statements. Either the test method is missing assert statements, which is an error, or the test method contains custom assert statements that do not follow a proper assert naming convention. Test methods are defined as public void methods that begin with the work test or have a @Test annotation. By default this rule applies to the default test class names, but this can be changed using the rule's applyToClassNames property. An assertion is defined as either using the assert keyword or invoking a method that starts with the work assert, like assertEquals, assertNull, or assertMyClassIsSimilar. Also, any method named should.* also counts as an assertion so that shouldFail methods do not trigger an assertion, any method that starts with fail>> counts as an assertion, and any method that starts with <<<verify counts as an assertion.

What counts as an assertion method can be overridden using the assertMethodPatterns property of the rule. The default value is this comma separated list of regular expressions:

        String assertMethodPatterns = 'assert.*,should.*,fail.*,verify.*'

If you'd like to add any method starting with 'ensure' to the ignores then you would set the value to this:

    'assert.*,should.*,fail.*,verify.*,ensure.*'

JUnitUnnecessarySetUp Rule

Rule that checks checks for JUnit setUp() methods that contain only a call to super.setUp(). The method is then unnecessary.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

Here is an example of a violation:

    class MyTest extends TestCase {
        void setUp() {              // violation
            super.setUp()
        }
    }

JUnitUnnecessaryTearDown Rule

Rule that checks checks for JUnit tearDown() methods that contain only a call to super.tearDown(). The method is then unnecessary.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

Here is an example of a violation:

    class MyTest extends TestCase {
        void tearDown() {               // violation
            super.tearDown()
        }
    }

JUnitUnnecessaryThrowsException Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.18

Check for throws clauses on JUnit test methods. That is not necessary in Groovy.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

Example of violations:

    @Test
    void shouldDoStuff() throws Exception { }           // violation

    @BeforeClass void initialize() throws Exception { } // violation
    @Before void setUp() throws RuntimeException { }    // violation
    @After void tearDown() throws Exception { }         // violation
    @AfterClass void cleanUp() throws Exception { }     // violation
    @Ignore void ignored() throws Exception { }         // violation

    class MyTest extends GroovyTestCase {
        void test1() throws Exception { }               // violation
        public void test2() throws IOException { }      // violation
    }

SpockIgnoreRestUsed Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.14

If Spock's @IgnoreRest appears on any method, all non-annotated test methods are not executed. This behaviour is almost always unintended. It's fine to use @IgnoreRest locally during development, but when committing code, it should be removed.

Example of violations:

    public class MySpec extends spock.lang.Specification {
        @spock.lang.IgnoreRest
        def "my first feature"() {
            expect: false
        }

        def "my second feature"() {
            given: def a = 2

            when: a *= 2

            then: a == 4
        }
    }

UnnecessaryFail Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.13

In a unit test, catching an exception and immediately calling Assert.fail() is pointless and hides the stack trace. It is better to rethrow the exception or not catch the exception at all.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

Example of violations:

    public void testSomething() {
        try {
            something()
        } catch (Exception e) {
            fail(e.message)
        }

        try {
            something()
        } catch (Exception e) {
            fail()
        }
    }

UseAssertEqualsInsteadOfAssertTrue Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.11

This rule detects JUnit assertions in object equality. These assertions should be made by more specific methods, like assertEquals.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

UseAssertFalseInsteadOfNegation Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.12

In unit tests, if a condition is expected to be false then there is no sense using assertTrue with the negation operator. For instance, assertTrue(!condition) can always be simplified to assertFalse(condition).

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

UseAssertTrueInsteadOfAssertEqualsRule Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.11

This rule detects JUnit calling assertEquals where the first parameter is a boolean. These assertions should be made by more specific methods, like assertTrue or assertFalse.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

All of the following examples can be simplified to assertTrue or remove the true literal:

    assertEquals(true, foo())
    assertEquals("message", true, foo())
    assert true == foo()
    assert foo() == true : "message"
    assertEquals(foo(), true)
    assertEquals("message", foo(), true)
    assertEquals(false, foo())
    assertEquals("message", false, foo())
    assert false == foo()
    assert foo() == false : "message"
    assertEquals(foo(), false)
    assertEquals("message", foo(), false)

UseAssertTrueInsteadOfNegation Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.12

In unit tests, if a condition is expected to be true then there is no sense using assertFalse with the negation operator. For instance, assertFalse(!condition) can always be simplified to assertTrue(condition).

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

UseAssertNullInsteadOfAssertEquals Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.11

This rule detects JUnit calling assertEquals where the first or second parameter is null. These assertion should be made against the assertNull method instead.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.

UseAssertSameInsteadOfAssertTrue Rule

Since CodeNarc 0.11

This rule detects JUnit calling assertTrue or assertFalse where the first or second parameter is an Object#is() call testing for reference equality. These assertion should be made against the assertSame or assertNotSame method instead.

This rule sets the default value of the applyToClassNames property to only match class names ending in 'Test', 'Tests' or 'TestCase'.